Can I Stop Paying Child Support if My Ex Won't Let Me See My Kids?

In Pennsylvania, parents are legally obligated to financially support their children until they turn 18 or graduate high school, whichever happens later. However, there is one issue that we see across the nation. It doesn’t matter if it’s Pennsylvania, Texas, or Washington – this same thing happens all the time: The noncustodial parent, which is usually the mother, but not always, will not let the noncustodial parent see their children for some reason. So, to lash back, the noncustodial stops paying child support.

The noncustodial parent’s logic is, “If I can’t see my kids, I don’t have to support them,” but it does NOT work that way. It is a myth that child custody and child support are connected in this way.

Some people probably have confusion because the amount of time a parent has with their children can affect child support as in, the more a parent has their kids, the less child support they may have to pay (this is fact-specific). But, that is not how it works when it comes to a noncustodial parent being barred from seeing their kids.

Child Support is Legally Required

If you are a noncustodial parent, please understand that if your ex blocks you from seeing your children, you cannot stop paying child support, nor can you reduce how much you pay. Child support and child custody are two separate matters.

If your ex is not letting you see your kids, this is not acceptable. You have parental rights, and we do not recommend doing nothing. After all, children benefit the most by having two loving parents who are very active in their lives.

Is your ex barring you from seeing your children? If so, continue to pay your full child support obligation, but please do go back to court promptly to enforce your court-ordered parenting time with your children.

Going back to court is your best legal recourse, and it’s important that you follow this course of action. The courts do not take kindly to parents who refuse to let their children see the noncustodial parent; so, as long as you are a kind, loving, responsible parent, the court should help reinforce your rights.

Next: How Noncustodial Parents Can Stay Involved!

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